Oxford Dictionary Word of the Day – Controversy

This is a new weekly post that I am trying out. I am taking the Oxford Dictionary word of the day, explaining the meaning and where it comes from, and then using it in a sentence that is somehow related to a sci-fi / fantasy world. The rest is up to you guys, I want you to post your own sentences in the comments field below, the crazier the better. Today’s word of the day is:

Controversy

noun (plural controversies)

Definition:
Prolonged public disagreement or heated discussion.

the design of the building has caused controversy

the announcement ended a protracted controversy

Origin:
late Middle English: from Latin controversia, from controversus ‘turned against, disputed’, from contro- (variant of contra- ‘against’) + versus, past participle of vertere ‘to turn’

Usage:
There are two possible pronunciations of the word controversy: one puts the stress on the con- and the other puts it on the -trov-. The second pronunciation, though common, is still widely held to be incorrect in standard English

My Sentence:
A peaceful demonstration demanding equal rights for dolphins has ended in controversy after the lead demonstrator was caught eating a can of tuna.

Ok, now its your turn. For the person who writes the best sentence this week, I will spare one of their pets from the Zombie Apocalypse.

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2 comments on “Oxford Dictionary Word of the Day – Controversy

  1. The gender of Medusa’s snakes was the subject of a certain amount of controversy at the Mythical Characters Anonymous meeting, particularly as the lady herself declined to comment.

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